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Every year, ASI selects new and innovative research projects at the VU for its seed money with the aim to foster innovative and interdisciplinary research across VU faculties.

Every year, ASI selects new and innovative research projects at the VU for its seed money with the aim to foster innovative and interdisciplinary research across VU faculties. 

This year, we again received a great number of proposals which cover a wide variety of topics and disciplines and show how diverse sustainability research is at the VU. All proposals were of high quality and “it was a pleasure to evaluate the projects and fascinating to see what ideas and initiatives are emerging out of the VU community”, as a member of the ASI grants committee put it. In the end, 4 projects received a full grant of EUR 10.000 and two projects were given a EUR 5.000 co-financing grant.

Find more information about the winning projects below in 'Edition 2022'. 

Seed money projects in previous years

  • Edition 2022

    Links between gender, indigeneity, sociopolitical, economic and biophysical factors and food security among the Mapuche in Chile

    Indigenous peoples in Latin America suffer from a long history of exploitation and marginalization and face poverty and food insecurity rates that are on average twice as high as compared to the non-indigenous population. Despite their dire conditions, there is a serious lack of systematic research into food insecurity among indigenous populations in Latin America. Hence, given the multifaceted problems  of food insecurity an intersectional framework is needed to fully identify the interlocking power systems and guide the empirical research. Specifically, this project analyzes links between gender, indigeneity, sociopolitical, economic and biophysical factors and food security among the Mapuche the largest ethnic majority in Chile. The project facilitates a survey among 700 randomly selected Mapuche and non-Mapuche households that complement the analyses of the political and social institutions. The results of our analysis will feed into prospective scenarios and actions that should improve the food security and livelihood conditions of the Mapuche people. The research project is part of an ongoing collaboration between the researchers at the Vrije Universiteit and the Universidad de la Frontera.

    Contact persons: 

    • Dr.ir. B.G.J.S. Sonneveld, senior researcher/lecturer, deputy director Amsterdam Centre for World Food Studies (ACWFS)/Athena Institute. Faculty of Science.
    • Dr. C.F.A van Wesenbeeck, associate professor, director Amsterdam Centre for World Food Studies (ACWFS). School of Business and Economics.
    • Ms. M. Vasquez Ladron de Guevara, Junior lecturer and researcher, Athena Institute, Faculty of Sciences
    • Dr. E. van Roekel, Senior researcher/lecturer cultural anthropology, Faculty of Social Sciences. 
    • Natalia Caniguan, Anthropologist and director Indigenous Institute, Universidad de la Frontera (UFRO). 
    • Dr. Gladys Illanes Morales, senior lecturer Public Health and epidemiology institute, Universidad de la Frontera (UFRO).
    • Dr. Maria Angelica Hernandez Moreno, senior lecturer community public health and natural environment, Centre for the Study and Promotion of Human Rights, Universidad de la Frontera (UFRO).
    • Marcelo Carrasco, social worker and director of Rural and Community Interdisciplinary Internship Program, UFRO.

    The environmental sustainability and costs of measures to reduce heat strain

    Climate change leads to an increase in extreme temperatures. Since morbidity and mortality are considerably elevated during thermal extremes, the Dutch government has serious concerns about health in thermal extremes and in particular in the heat. Therefore, heat measures are summarized and advised in order to reduce the impact of heat in vulnerable people. 

    However, these measures are not rated for their sustainability and costs. For instance, air-conditioners are effective in reducing temperature, but expensive and not environmentally friendly. In contrast, fans are low cost and use approximately 30-times less electricity to operate compared to standard air-conditioning units, but can only provide cooling in the heat when people sweat. The goal of this project is to extend the evaluation of measures to reduce heat strain in humans with an analysis of their environmental sustainability and financial costs. 

     Contact persons:

    • Iris Dijkstra, MSc., Junior researcher in (environmental) exercise physiology
    • Prof. dr. Hein Daanen, Full professor in (environmental) exercise physiology
    • Prof. dr. Wouter Botzen, Full Professor in Economics of Climate Change and Natural Disasters 
    • Dr. Coen Bongers, Radboudumc, Postdoc researcher in (environmental) exercise physiology
    • Max Tesselaar, MSc., PhD Candidate in the Environmental Economics
    • Saro Campisano, Hedgehog company

    A Sustainable Cloud: Tactics for Urban Futures

    The resources required by data centers are witnessing an unsustainable growth. How to evolve digital infrastructures so that the cloud becomes sustainable, is a crucial problem that needs to be addressed, and fast. A concrete example of this issue is evident in the Netherlands, which is attracting a growing number of Big Tech companies, while being distributed over a relatively small geographical area. As a solution, classic centralized hyperscale data centers can be disaggregated into distributed cloud environments in the built environment. The smart distribution of computational and storage capabilities would allow to alleviate the burden of energy demands over a wider geographical area, bring the data closer to the end-user (thus saving telecommunication resources by reducing latency and data traffic), and even empower energy prosumption. Sustainable cloud environments, however, require well designed built environments, allowing the seamless software-enabled placement of data and computational tasks to follow time, space, and energy. 

    With this project, we aim at uncovering tactics that combine technical software solutions for distributed clouds (from computer science) and novel business- and behavioral models for the built environment (from economics). The combination can help achieve cloud sustainability. As a pilot study, we will also analyze the portfolio of cloud-based software and data management of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and start identifying tactics for decreasing its energy footprint. The resulting tactics will be shared as an Open Archive.

    Contact persons: 

    • Prof. Dr. Patricia Lago
    • Prof. Dr. Henri de Groot
    • Dr. Roberto Verdecchia
    • Robin van der Wiel  

    Locusts and Wild Honey

    It is widely argued that the ecological crisis we are facing today, is for a large part the consequence of destructive (Western) human attitudes, actions and underlying worldviews characterized by anthropocentrism. If we, as human species, wish to turn the tide, we need to encourage attitudes, actions and worldviews that are more eco-centric, that is, more concerned with the world as a whole, the human and more-than-human world together. This need certainly also pertains to education, not only to its contents but also to its epistemology.

    "Locusts and Wild Honey" is an exploratory project that aims to develop a new approach to literary texts in higher education in the context of the climate crisis. In doing so, it integrates insights from 'wild pedagogies', which have not yet been applied in academic teaching on literature (both secular and religious). Wild pedagogies are pedagogical approaches that are about reimagining and enacting human relationships within the more-than-human world, and does this, among other things, through challenging an overabundant sense of control and reflecting on agency and the role of nature as co-teacher.

    Contact persons: 

    • Iris Veerbeek, MA, junior fellow ‘Ethics in the Anthropocene’ (2021), project coordinator Active and Blended Learning, Faculty of Religion and Theology
    • Dr. Frans Kamsteeg, Associate Professor of Culture, Organisation and Management, Faculty of Social Sciences
    • Dr. Harry Wels, Associate Professor of Culture, Organisation and Management, Faculty of Social Sciences
    • Prof. Dr. Peter-Ben Smit, Professor of Contextual Biblical Interpretation, Faculty of Religion and Theology
    • Dr. Kristine Steenbergh, Associate Professor of English Literature, Faculty of Humanities
    • Prof. Dr. Jessica Vance Roitman, Professor of Jewish Studies, Faculty of Religion and Theology
    • Prof. Dr. Gerdien Bertram-Troost, Professor of Education in Worldview and Pedagogical Perspective, Faculty of Religion and Theology
    • Dr. Pieter Coppens, Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Religion and Theology

    How hazard scales can support and improve risk communication

    For decades, meteorologists and governments have been warning coastal communities for an imminent hurricane using the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. This scale, however, is flawed: it only categorizes a hurricane by its maximum wind speed, whereas a hurricane can also cause substantial impacts through high storm surges and large precipitation totals. To overcome this limitation of the Saffir-Simpson scale, various alternative classification methods have been proposed, incorporating information on the other hurricane hazards. In this ASI-funded research, we will study risk perception under alternative hurricane hazard scales, such as the Tropical Cyclone Severity Scale, as a communication and forecast tool. The results will provide valuable insights in how hazard scales can support and improve risk communication, allowing for enhanced storm preparations and ultimately saving more lives. 

    Contact persons: 

    • Dr. Nadia Bloemendaal - IVM, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
    • Prof. Dr. Kees Boersma 
    • Amy Polen, M.P.H., C.P.H. - University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida
    • Prof. Dr. Jennifer Collins  - University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida
    • Hans de Mol - IVM, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
    • Jantsje de Mol - Center for Research in Experimental Economics and Political Decision Making, University of Amsterdam

    Decolonising Sustainability Transitions Research in Practice

    One of the most urgent discussions taking place at the crossroads of sustainability transitions research and post- and decolonial studies today is: how can global ecological collapse be countered without erasing the local realities of indigenous peoples worldwide? The challenge is that while the ongoing ecological collapse forms a global emergency, any universal solution is problematic since it is by definition bound to override local, indigenous autonomy. Yet, developing new, ambitious and potent decolonial research designs and practices to address such obstacles is fraught with challenges. A major difficulty concerns research grants, since calls for funding tend to work with criteria that tacitly reinforce inequitable and hierarchical research practices that effectively exclude indigenous and global south thinkers and leaders; for instance by restricting eligibility to scholars based in the Netherlands/Europe, restricting the understanding of social impact and valorisation to the Dutch/European contexts, and upholding a scientific view of research methods that may be at odds with indigenous views of knowledge generation and dissemination. Accordingly, the research question that this project will investigate is: How can academics collaborate with indigenous communities to co-create decolonial sustainability transitions research practices that counter the neo-colonialist extraction of planetary and financial resources, and of local knowledges? To address this question the project will employ a grounded approach and organize a series of workshops together with indigenous thinkers and leaders.

    Contact persons: 

    • Dr Joana Meroz, assistant professor in design culture, history and theory, Faculty of Humanities, Art and Culture, History, Antiquity, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
    • Prof Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach, professor of philosophy, Faculty of Humanities, Ancient, Patristic and Medieval Philosophy, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
    • Prof Wouter Veraart, professor of legal philosophy, Faculty of Law, Legal Theory and Legal History, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
    • Dr Peter Versteeg, assistant professor in the anthropology of religion, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
  • Edition 2021

    Gold in Crisis – New environmental threats and global crime in South America

    South America is a region of prolonged social and ecological crisis. This project takes gold mining as a productive lens to examine these social dynamics for the cases of Colombia and Venezuela. Access to gold-rich territories is highly contested, mining causes pollution and deforestation, and from the moment of extraction, gold is a substance that has direct exchange value in global business networks that operate between formal and informal institutions. As such, the project explores the question: How do local dynamics of gold mining in Colombia and Venezuela drive contemporary global forms of social and environmental crisis? To highlight the relationship between local land uses and global forms of crisis and crime, we rely on a hybrid methodological approach that involves ethnographic fieldwork, qualitative criminological research, and spatial analysis and geospatial modelling of deforestation. By taking a multi-disciplinary approach, our project empirically connects local land uses, resource economies and alternative governance regimes to new forms of global exploitation of people and the environment.

    Contact persons:

    • Dr. Jesse Jonkman, Social & Cultural Anthropology, Faculty of Social Sciences
    • Dr. Žiga Malek, Environmental Geography, Faculty of Science
    • Dr. Clarissa Meerts, Criminology, Faculty of Law
    • Dr. Eva van Roekel, Social & Cultural Anthropology, Faculty of Social Sciences

    FireScapes – Towards an interdisciplinary understanding of wildfire risk mitigation in the Dutch landscape

    Over the last year, the number of wildfires has increased dramatically in the Netherlands and they are expected to increase further. This increase can be attributed to both climate change and changes in the use and management of the land. Researchers and fire practitioners plead for measures to prevent the spreading of fires over large natural areas, for example by developing vegetation buffers of low flammability between highly flammable areas. There are some important knowledge gaps that hamper the design of appropriate and effective prevention methods of wildfires in the Netherlands. While some measures exist, they may not be suitable for the Dutch landscape. Secondly, the current increase as well as prevention and mitigation of wildfires are the result of complex human-nature interactions. The design of appropriate measures therefore requires transdisciplinary collaboration and knowledge production. In this project, we want to map this knowledge gap on the relationship between wildfires, wildfire risk reduction and mitigation measures and the ecological, cultural and political values of the Dutch landscape. 

    Contact persons:

    • Dr. Linde Egberts, Art and Culture, History, Antiquity, Faculty of Humanities, CLUE+Research Institute
    • Dr. Evelien de Hoop, Athena Institute,Faculty of Science
    • Dr. Marleen de Ruiter, Water & Climate Risk, Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science
    • Dr. Sander Veraverbeke, Earth & Climate, Faculty of Science

    Festivals as innovative spaces for sustainability transition

    The urgent need for transition towards a sustainable society calls for novel initiatives to engage and mobilize people. In this research, it is claimed contemporary festivals can provide spaces for sustainability transition. Festivals are purposeful (inter)organizational productions that form temporary, ‘liminal’ spaces, set apart from ordinary, everyday settings, in which co-creation and innovation arise, having transformative potential. The research further taps into the notion that festivals are microcosms that can serve as prototypes for wider society. Namely, innovations can be tested in a festival space like a living lab representative of society, after which they can be applied or upscaled beyond the space if proven fruitful. Examples include the (re)design and (re)construction of energy, water, food and waste in a circular and sustainable way, and the formulation of alternative cultural norms, values and practices to raise awareness and shape behavior towards sustainable communities. To explore this, the aim of this qualitative research is to investigate how festivals can be conceptualized and organized as transformational spaces, and the theoretical and societal implications thereof. The expected contribution of this research is the implication that festivals represent new organizational forms and innovative spaces to facilitate sustainability transition.

    Contact persons:

    • Dr. Leonore van den Ende, Organization Science, Faculty of Social Science
    • Prof. Alfons van Marrewijk, Organization Science, Faculty of Social Science
    • Dr. Ernst Graamans, Management and Organization, School of Business and Economics
    • Dr. Edina Doci, Management and Organization, School of Business and Economics

    Firm-survey evidence on environmental policy and barriers to energy efficiency investments

    Hazards of climate change require us to make more efficient use of energy, as fossil energy usage often goes hand in hand with damages to the environment and climate. Firms play an important role in reducing fossil energy usage and increasing sustainable energy use. Energy is an important input to any firm’s production process. Since energy is costly, economic theory predicts that profit-maximizing firms make investments that profitably reduce energy usage. Nevertheless, many studies have identified a gap between seemingly optimal energy-efficiency investments and actual investments. This gap has been dubbed the ‘Energy Efficiency Paradox’. With the ASI seed money funds, we will survey Dutch firms to investigate the reasons for the existence of the energy-efficiency gap. Our survey will focus on issues related to environmental policy, labor market bottlenecks, capital market imperfections, misperceptions held by firms, and uncertainty over future technologies and policies. Results will contribute to current policy discussions in the Netherlands and allow for policy recommendations to increase energy-efficiency investments among Dutch firms.

    Contact persons:

    • MSc Leon Bremer, Spatial Economics, School of Business and Economics
    • MSc Sacha den Nijs, Spatial Economics, School of Business and Economics
    • Dr. Gerard van der Meijden, Spatial Economics, School of Business and Economics
    • Dr. Mark Koetse, Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science
    • Prof.dr.ir. Bart Bossink, Science, Business & Innovation, Faculty of Science

    Interrelating in the Anthropocene

    Operating at the interface of the humanities: theology/religious studies, the social sciences, and biology this project investigates the potential of cultural and religious imaginations, practices, and conceptualizations for reimagining human-nature relationships in the context of the Anthropocene. In a series of focused workshops (on human-plant relations; human-animal relations, and food practices), an interdisciplinary group of experts will come together to discuss how, why, or even if cultural and religious conceptualizations and practices matter for human-nature relationships in the Anthropocene.

    Contact persons:

    • Prof. Dr. Peter-Ben Smit, Text & Traditions, Faculty of Religion and Theology
    • Dr. Kristine Steenbergh, English Literature, Faculty of Humanities
    • Prof. Dr. Jessica Vance Roitman, Text & Traditions, Faculty of Religion and Theology
    • Dr. Frans Kamsteeg, Organization Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences
    • Dr. Harry Wels, Organization Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences
  • Edition 2020

    Enabling and empowering social entrepreneurship

    This project aims to enable and empower social entrepreneurship, dealing with social and environmental issues. Well-known examples of social entrepreneurship are Tony’s Chocolonely (aimed at fighting slave labor in the cacao value chain, among others) and Dopper (aimed at reducing the use of plastic, among others), but also many other, often small-scaled, firms are practicing social entrepreneurship. Growing interest among citizens, policymakers and scholars regarding the positive impacts of entrepreneurial action beyond economic growth is clear. Thus, the core of this project are two days with a group of 25 entrepreneurs on the practices of opportunity creation, mobilization of supportive communities and organizational survival in competitive markets. The 25 entrepreneurs may represent existing businesses as well as start-ups.

    Contact persons:

    • Prof. Enno Masurel, Department of Management and Organization / VU Center for Entrepreneurship, School of Business and Economics
    • Dr Neil Thompson, Department of Management and Organization, School of Business and Economics
    • Dr Michel Verver, Department of Organization Sciences, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Social Science

    Plastic, science and society symposium: An exploration of the power of transdisciplinarity in sustainability research and education

    This project aims to unite disciplines and help scientists and students working on this topic open their minds to new ways of thinking about these complex issues surrounding the plastics problem. If there was ever a global issue that required creative thinking outside the box, this is it. We will achieve this through bringing scholars of different disciplines together with artists and other societal actors in an interactive one-day symposium aimed to discuss inter- and transdisciplinary approaches to dealing with the plastic pollution issue. A mix of lectures and workshops have been organized.

    Contact persons:

    • Dr Heather Leslie, Department of Environment & Health, Faculty of Science
    • Miranda van Holland, 3D Program Coordinator, EARS, Valorization Officer Faculty of Religion and Theology

    Growing up with hope or despair? Investigating Dutch teenagers’ comportment towards the future in the age of climate change

    In this project, we wish to explore what climate change means for Dutch teenagers’ view of their future. A special role is given to the concept of hope. To do so, we will investigate how teenagers relate themselves to narratives of hope, optimism, pessimism and cynicism. The project’s main research question is how do Dutch teenagers comport themselves towards the future in the age of climate change? A central role is given to the understanding of hope as can be found in the work of Jonathan Sacks and Erik Borgman.

    Contact persons: 

    • Dr Gerdien Bertram-Troost, Faculty of Religion and Theology and Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences 
    • Drs Jan Jorrit Hasselaar, Amsterdam Centre for Religion and Sustainable Development, Faculty of Religion and Theology
    • Dr Barbara Regeer, Athena Institute, Faculty of Science
    • Dr Pim Klaassen, Athena Institute, Faculty of Science
    • Dr Willemine Willems, Athena Institute, Faculty of Science

    Dutch homes gas-free by 2050? Speeding up the rate of energy-efficient renovations with the help of behavioral research

    The energy-efficient renovation of residential homes is one of the big challenges the Netherlands faces. As high up-front cost and lack of trust were identified as perceived major barriers for energy-efficient renovations, behavioral interventions need to enhance trust and address the renovation measures’ relative costs and benefits. This asks for a concerted effort of behavioral researchers as well as businesses and public authorities to jointly research behavioral interventions to speed up the renovation rate. To this end, we will jointly set up a long-term collaborative research initiative, C-Lab Energy, that aims to build up a database on individual renovation decisions from various sources (surveys, online experiments, field experiments, existing statistical and geodata) to enable researchers from ASI and other Dutch universities to jointly research the barriers to energy-efficient renovations as well as instruments to overcome them.

    Contact persons: 

    • Dr Julia Blasch, Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Faculty of Science 
    • Dr Menusch Khadjavi, Department of Spatial Economics, School of Business and Economics 
    • Dr Giuliana Spadaro, Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences

    Human mortality in European cities under climate change

    While the previous ASI project focused on empirical analyses of climate-related mortality in the Netherlands, the current project is an upscaling of these findings (along with other information and studies, see methodology) in a European scale analysis of expected mortality changes and related economic impacts in cities due to climate change. Thus, we will develop a spatially explicit model that projects mortality changes for all major European cities under various climate change and socio-economic scenarios of population change, while accounting for additional warming from the UHI. This impact model can according to the IPCC (2014) risk assessment framework be divided in hazard, exposure, and vulnerability components. The hazard model is based on a newly developed Integrated Assessment Model called CLIMRISK (Estrada and Botzen, 2019) which produces spatially explicit temperature projections under climate change scenarios that are probabilistic by accounting for uncertainty in GCM temperature projections and climate sensitivity.

    Contact persons: 

    • Prof. Wouter Botzen, Department of Environmental Economics, Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Sciences 
    • Prof. Hein Daanen, Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences

    Does climate change cause emotional stress and undermine attention and productivity?

    There is increasing attention for the link between emotions and climate change. This project examines the emotions linked to climate change: whether explicit reminders of climate change may interfere with both emotions and cognitive performance. In particular, using online experimentation services 2 (Qualtrics), we will examine in two Western countries (i.e., Germany, The Netherlands) whether reminders of climate change will make people (a) experience more negative emotions (especially worry and helplessness, but also regret and social emotions such as shame and guilt), and (b) perform worse on simple, incentivized cognitive attention performance tasks.

    Contact persons: 

    • Prof. Paul A. M. van Lange, Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences 
    • Dr Menusch Khadjavi, Department of Spatial Economics, School of Business and Economics

    Looking where no one is looking – a food system horizon scan to identify emerging food system issues

    In order to manage wicked food system problems and to make progress towards the grand challenge of food system sustainability, we need to develop novel research approaches that include multiple diverse perspectives, that challenge assumptions and that aim to illuminate the unexpected. In this project we aim to use 'horizon scanning techniques' to truly identify food system issues that are at the margins of current attention, that are novel and unexpected – we aim to look where none is looking or identify the ‘unasked questions’. To foster the out-of-the-box thinking that is required for such a goal, we will carry out small-scale workshops with leading thinkers on food system sustainability from within and outside VU. The proposed food system horizon scan would thus help VU food system researchers carry out more transformative and boundarypushing research and help VU take a role of transformational leadership in food system research.

    Contact persons: 

    • Dr Verena Seufert, Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Faculty of Science 
    • Dr Lia van Wesenbeeck, Amsterdam Centre for World Food Studies (ACWFS), School of Business and Economics 
    • Dr Tomris Cesuroglu, Athena Institute, Faculty of Science

    ICT 4 Food Security (I4FoodSec)

    In the concern for food and nutrition security in poor rural regions in countries such as Mali Burkina Faso and the north of Ghana, the seed value chain plays an important role. This research will pilot the application of an interdisciplinary approach called “Decision Maps” (Lago, 2019) so far applied to Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solutions for Urban Futures, on the question of how to improve the seed production in Mali in a sustainable way. It does so based on locally-collected information from the farmers and farmer organizations (in previous projects). 

    Contact persons: 

    • Prof. Patricia Lago, Professor of Software Engineering and Sustainability, Faculty of Science 
    • Anna Bon, Senior Advisor, CIS-VU – Center of International Collaboration 
    • Wendelien Tuyp, Advisor Sustainable Land Management, CIS-VU – Center of International Collaboration
  • Edition 2019

    Workshop transitions in food-water-energy infrastructures

    Contact persons: 

    • Prof. P.J.E.M. van Dam, Environmental Humanities Center, Faculty of Humanities 
    • Dr S.J. Kluiving, Environmental Humanities Center, Faculty of Humanities 
    • Prof. K. Kwastek, Environmental Humanities Center, Faculty of Humanities 
    • Dr K. Steenbergh, Environmental Humanities Center, Faculty of Humanities 
    • Dr F.K. Boersema, Institute for Societal Resilience, Faculty of Social Science 
    • Dr T.I.E. Veldkamp, Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Faculty of Science

    Misconceptions of Millennials: An interdisciplinary pilot study on consumer misconceptions about sustainable food choices and motivations for dietary change

    Contact persons: 

    • Dr Julia Blasch, Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Faculty of Science 
    • Dr Harry Aiking, Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Faculty of Science 
    • Dr Ziga Malek, Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Faculty of Science 
    • Jantsje Mol MSc, Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Faculty of Science 
    • Dr Meike Morren, Department of Marketing, School of Business and Economics 
    • Ivar Maas, Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences

    In hope we trust?

    Contact persons: 

    • Prof. Philipp Pattberg, Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Faculty of Science 
    • Dr Paul Koster, Department of Spatial Economics, School of Business and Economics 
    • Prof. Peter-Ben Smit, Department of Texts and Traditions, Faculty of Theology and Religion 
    • Drs. Jan Jorrit Hasselaar MA, Amsterdam Centre for Religion & Sustainable Development, Faculty of Theology and Religion

    Drivers of climate-related human mortality and economic impacts

    Contact persons: 

    • Prof. Wouter Botzen, Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science 
    • Prof. Hein Daanen, Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences 
    • Mireille Folkerts, Department Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences 
    • Mike Martinius, Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science

    Smart blue-green roof at VU Aula

    Contact persons: 

    • Dr Martijn Westhoff, Institute for Earth and Climate, Faculty of Science 
    • Dr Ralph Lasage, Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Faculty of Science 
    • Prof. Jacob de Boer, Department of Environment and Health, Faculty of Science 
    • Prof. Petra van Dam, Environmental Humanities Center, Faculty of Humanities